How to meditate on the go

What is meditation?

Meditation is a practice of quieting the mind — and, as it turns out, can be done anywhere. The act of meditation entails focusing on the present moment and being more mindful of your surroundings. Contrary to what many non-meditators think, meditation is not about “going blank” or not thinking at all. For example, when meditating in an unfamiliar place, it’s normal to be curious about your surroundings and to find yourself thinking things like “Is this seat comfortable?” “What am I going to eat today?” or “How much time do I have left before my next meeting?” Rather than trying to stop these thoughts altogether, meditation enables you to create some space between having a thought and immediately reacting to it. This helps you relax, stay focused, and calm in an unfamiliar environment.

The benefits of meditation on the go.

Now that you know what meditation is and the different forms it can take, let’s explore the benefits of meditation when done while traveling.

The practice of meditation has been linked to improved mental health. Studies have shown that frequent meditators show a reduction in symptoms related to depression, anxiety, and chronic stress. That being said, there are few practical reasons for someone to meditate on the go beyond a desire for relaxation or stress relief.

Meditation is an extremely effective way to relax and reduce stress levels in one’s life. The ability to relax on the go can be very useful in promoting both human development and general wellness. Studies have shown that people who are able to relax while traveling exhibit higher levels of happiness than those who do not foster such a practice.

Meditation Techniques

IIf you’re in a public place and you want to meditate but feel uncomfortable, you can try something like an active meditation. In this case, walking is the activity. And instead of focusing on your breath, you focus on your movement. Here are some ideas for meditating while walking:

Walk slowly and focus on each step — the sensation of your foot touching the ground, feeling balanced over your feet as they shift from one side to another, the shift in weight from heel to toe as you move forward. These are all sensations that are unique to walking and require very little effort or concentration to notice.

If counting while sitting feels soothing, try counting while walking too — maybe count each time your left foot touches down or each time your right foot hits the ground!

Notice how your feet move when you walk: maybe they rock back and forth or maybe they slide outwards slightly with pressure before pushing off forwards again. If it helps, bring attention to these small movements by bringing them into focus through repetition. How does stepping one foot after another effect the way that part of it moves? Can you change how it moves if you think about it? Is there anything else about how that feels that is interesting or different than what you normally pay attention to?

Follow these tips and you will be able to meditate wherever you are.

If you’re in a public place and you want to meditate but feel uncomfortable, you can try something like an active meditation. In this case, walking is the activity. And instead of focusing on your breath, you focus on your movement. Here are some ideas for meditating while walking:

Walk slowly and focus on each step — the sensation of your foot touching the ground, feeling balanced over your feet as they shift from one side to another, the shift in weight from heel to toe as you move forward. These are all sensations that are unique to walking and require very little effort or concentration to notice.

If counting while sitting feels soothing, try counting while walking too — maybe count each time your left foot touches down or each time your right foot hits the ground!

Notice how your feet move when you walk: maybe they rock back and forth or maybe they slide outwards slightly with pressure before pushing off forwards again. If it helps, bring attention to these small movements by bringing them into focus through repetition. How does stepping one foot after another effect the way that part of it moves? Can you change how it moves if you think about it? Is there anything else about how that feels that is interesting or different than what you normally pay attention to?

What are some of your tips and techniques on meditation on the go?

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